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  J. Henri Poincare 
 (1854-1912)

Final Answers
© 2000-2018   Gérard P. Michon, Ph.D.

Chaos  Theory

Related articles:

Related Links (Outside this Site)

What is Chaos Theory?   by  The Fractal Foundation
 
Wikipedia :   Chaos Theory   |   Strange attractor

Videos

The Strange New Science of Chaos (57:34)  Nova S16 #3  (PBS, 1989-01-31).
Why 4.669 is famous (18:54)  by  Ben Sparks  (Numberphile, 2017-01-16).
 
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Chaos Theory


(2018-04-02)   Long-Term Stability of the Solar System

 Come back later, we're
 still working on this one...

Victor Puiseux (1820-1883)   |   Spiru Haret (1851-1912)
J. Henri Poincaré (1854-1912; X1873)   |   J.E. Littlewood (1885-1977)   |   Mary Cartwright (1900-1998)
Andrey Kolmogorov (1903-1987)   |   KAM Theorem (1963)   |   Gabriella Pinzari (1966-)


(2018-04-01)   The Butterfly Effect   (Edward N. Lorenz, 1962)
The chaotic nature of mereorology.

 Come back later, we're
 still working on this one...

The Strange New Science of Chaos (57:34)  Nova Season 16, Episode 3  (PBS, 1989-01-31).
 
Edward Norton Lorenz (1917-2008)


(2003-07-30)     Feigenbaum Constants   (Mitchell J. Feigenbaum,  1975)
d =   4.669201609102990671853203820466201617258185577475769-
a = -2.502907875095892822283902873218215786381271376727150-

Bifurcation Velocity   (first Feigenbaum constant) :

The "bifurcation velocity" (d) governs the geometric onset of  chaos  via period-doubling in iterative sequences (with respect to some parameter which is used linearly in each iteration, to damp a given function having a quadratic maximum).

This universal constant was unearthed in October 1975 by Mitchell J. Feigenbaum (b.1944).

Reduction Parameter   (second Feigenbaum constant) :

The related "reduction parameter" (a) is the second Feigenbaum constant...

 Come back later, we're
 still working on this one...

Feigenbaum Constant :   MathWorld  (Eric W. Weisstein)   |   Mathsoft  (Steve Finch)
 
Why 4.669 is famous (18:54)  by  Ben Sparks  (Numberphile, 2017-01-16).

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