Numericana Hall of Fame
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Many people share their knowledge on the Internet, but the outstanding contributions of a few dedicated scientists belong in this "Hall of Fame" (in alphabetical order).  [ Nominate ]

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Suzanne Alejandre
John C. Baez
Alexander Bogomolny
Kevin S. Brown
Chris K. Caldwell
Peter J. Cameron
David W. Cantrell
Umberto Cerruti
Jim Clark
Karl Dahlke
David Darling
Glenn Elert
David Eppstein
Chris Hillman
Brady Haran
Colin Hughes
Ron Kurtus
Cynthia Lanius
Walter Lewin
Jeff Miller
Robert Munafo
Rod Nave
John J. O'Connor
Sten Odenwald
Ed Pegg Jr.
Dan Piponi
Simon Plouffe
Henry Reich
Edmund Robertson
Russ Rowlett
Dave Rusin
Christoph Schiller
Alom Shaha
Neil Sloane
Leonard Susskind
Terence Tao
Vitalii Vanovschi
Mike de Villiers
Eric Weisstein
Robin Whitty
Ned Wright
 

 Suzanne Alejandre Suzanne Alejandre, math teacher

Suzanne Alejandre  is  Educational Resource & Service Developer  at  The Math Forum @ Drexel.  She has been providing online lesson plans conforming to the  NCTM Standards  (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics).

Suzanne's Mathematics Lessons   |   Ask Dr. Math   |   The Math Forum @ Drexel


 John Carlos Baez 
 (b. 1961) before 2002John C. Baez, mathematical physicist (b.1961)

Professor of mathematics, at UC Riverside and cousin of the American folk singer Joan Baez (b.1941-01-09).  John Baez is a one-man Internet army who has answered many physics questions on sci.physics.research.  In 1993, he started an  aperiodic column reputed to have inspired the  blog  format.

This Week's Finds in Mathematical Physics  |  John Baez's Stuff & Fun Stuff  |  n-category Café  |  Azimuth  |  Wikipedia


 Alexander Bogomolny Alexander Bogomolny, software developer

Former Associate Prof. of Mathematics, University of Iowa.
Until May 2004, Alexander Bogomolny had a monthly column on the site of the  Mathematical Association of America.

Cut The Knot   |   Other Math Sites   |   PhD (1981)


 Kevin Brown Dr. Kevin S. Brown  (Kent, WA)

Kevin Brown  signs his name only once in his  MathPages  website  (which doesn't have  any  external links).  Before 1999, he was discussing Relativity and other mathematical topics on USENET.  He's related to Fred Olden, not Anatoly.

MathPages.com   |   Reflections on Relativity   |   Kevin Brown's Storefront


 Chris Caldwell Chris K. Caldwell, number theorist (b. 1956)

Professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, at UT Martin.


home   |   The Prime Pages   |   The Prime Glossary   |   PhD (1984)


 Peter Jephson Cameron Peter J. Cameron, mathematician (b. 1947)

Australian mathematician.  Emeritus professor of mathematics at Queen Mary.


Home   |   Blog   |   Theorem of the Day   |   Wikipedia


 David W. Cantrell David W. Cantrell, mathematician (b. 1949)

Known for his presence on mathematical newsgroups, where he answers popular questions and offers original contributions,  David Cantrell also contributes to MathWorld, Numericana, etc.


Ignorance is bliss...   |   Recent Posts   |   FaceBook


 Umberto Cerruti Umberto Cerruti, algebraist (b. 1948)

Department of Mathematics, University of Torino (Italy).

Math News


 Jim Clark Jim Clark, chemistry teacher (b. 1944)

A Cambridge graduate who spent over 30 years teaching A-level chemistry  (to 16-18 year old students).  In 1997, he retired from Truro School (Cornwall) to concentrate on writing and promoting a true  understanding of chemistry.

about   |   Amazon page   |   Chemguide online


 Karl Dahlke Karl Dahlke, blind scientist (b. 1960)

Dahlke has been  totally blind  since age 10.  He once managed to write a speech synthesizer on his Apple II using the bell as sole feedback.  His text-based mathematical site is so good that it can be  extremely  useful to sighted people.

home   |   edbrowse  (Editor Browser for the blind )   |   mathreference.com


 David Darling David Darling, science writer (b. 1953)

David Darling  earned his Ph.D. in Astronomy from Manchester in 1977 under Zdenek Kopal and worked for Cray Research...  A full-time writer since 1982, Darling has lived in both the US and the UK.  He has been running his websites since 1999.

The Worlds of David Darling  |  Encyclopedia of Science  |  Sustainable Living  |  Children's Encyclopedia


 Glenn Elert Glenn Elert, physics teacher

Glenn Elert teaches at Midwood High School at Brooklyn College (NY).  He acts as the editor of the  Physics Factbook,  a large collection of essays written by high-school students as an exercise in  library research  methods (in a scientific context).

home   |   Hypertextbook + new   |   Physics Factbook   |   Get Bent


 David Eppstein David A. Eppstein, computer scientist

Professor in the School of Information and Computer Science, at UC Irvine.

The Geometry Junkyard   |   PhD (1989)


 University of Nottingham

 Brady Haran Brady Haran, Australian video journalist

Brady  started the  Periodic Table of Videos (PTOV) in 2008 as an unscripted series of interviews with  Martyn Poliakoff.  This grew into several series about Science  (more recently, religion and philosophy)  featuring an endearing bunch of faculty members at the University of Nottingham.

home  |  blog  |  Periodic Table of Videos  |  Sixty Symbols  |  Test Tube  |  Backstage Science  |  My Favourite Scientist


 Chris Hillman Chris Hillman, general relativist

Chris started RelWWW as a graduate student at UW in 1992.  He left his pages in the care of John Baez before returning in March 2007, disappointed by his Wikipedia experience.  Sadly, Hillman lost faith again in June 2007 but remains active online.

Relativity on the World Wide Web ("RelWWW" closed down in June 2007)   |   Ersatz, S. Carroll, etc.


 Colin Hughes Colin Hughes, British Teacher

In October 2001,  Colin Hughes  started  Project Euler  (as a section of MathsChallenge.net)  where readers are posed mathematical questions which can be answered by designing a computer program that can run in "less than a minute".

Project Euler   |   MathsChallenge.net   |   Wikipedia (Project Euler)


 Ron Kurtus Ron Kurtus, engineer (b. 1940)

Ron Kurtus is an engineer who spent a few years in the entertainment industry before returning to electro-optical engineering.  He has established a strong online presence focusing on Science education, mostly at the high-school level.

home   |   School for Champions (SfC)   |   SfC Publishing


 Cynthia Lanius Cynthia Lanius, teacher & activist

Cynthia Lanius is vocal about the underrepresentation of women in mathematics and computing.  She is Associate director for  The Math Forum @ Drexel, but continues to maintain her own k-12 math site, hosted at Rice University.

Fun Mathematics Lessons (K-12)   |   Ask Dr. Math   |   The Math Forum @ Drexel


 Walter H.G. Lewin Walter Lewin, professor of physics  (b. 1936)

Walter Lewin is an astrophysicist and a teacher with a flair for showmanship.  His legendary undergraduate lectures at MIT were broadcasted by UWTV (Seattle) and are available online in video form, through MIT's OpenCourseWare.

home  |  Basic Physics   |   Electricity & Magnetism   |  Vibrations & Waves  |  MIT World  |  NY Times  |  Last lecture


 Jeff Miller Jeff Miller, educator

A teacher at Gulf High School in  New Port Richey  (Florida)  Jeff Miller maintains an authoritative page about the "Earliest Known Uses of Some of the Words of Mathematics".


home   |   Words of Mathematics   |   Mathematical Symbols   |   Stamps   |   other pages


 Robert Munafo Robert Munafo, programmer (b. 1964)

An amateur mathematician whose interests include integer sequences, large numbers and fractals  (especially the Mandelbrot setMunafo  maintains an authoritative site on trivia about specific numbers.  He has contributed to Sloane's OEIS.

home  |  OEIS wiki  |  MCS  |  RIES  |  Numbers  |  Large Numbers  |  Mandelbrot set  |  Gray-Scott model


 Carl R. Nave 
 (Rod Nave at the blackboard) Carl R. "Rod" Nave, professor of physics

Department of Physics & Astronomy, Georgia State University.  The quaint style of HyperPhysics comes from the  HyperCard ® system (Apple Computer) for which it was originally designed.


HyperPhysics   [ without index frame ]   |   HyperMath


 J.J. O'Connor John J. O'Connor  (b. 1945)

J.J. O'Connor is one of the two editors (with E.F. Robertson) of the authoritative  MacTutor History of Mathematics  archive, which is the most popular  online  part of the  Mathematical MacTutor  "stack"  (running on Apple's HyperCard  system).

home   |   stats   |   MacTutor History of Mathematics   |   Wikipedia


 Sten Odenwald Sten F. Odenwald, astronomer (b. 1952)

Born in Karlskoga, Sweden,  Sten Odenwald  received his Ph.D. in astronomy from Harvard in 1982.  An award-winning educator and author of several books, he is currently affiliated with NASA's GSFC and the Catholic University of America.

blog / bio  |  Space Math @ NASA  |  IMAGE  |  Hinode  |  Ask the Astronomer  |  The Astronomy Café


 Ed Pegg Jr. Ed Pegg, Jr. (1963-)  recreational mathematician

As a mathematician with a strong interest in recreational mathematics,  Ed Pegg Jr.  may well be the  heir apparent  to  Martin Gardner  (1914-2010)  in the Internet era.  He helped Stephen Wolfram with NKS and joined MathWorld in 2004.

Ed Pegg Jr.'s Math Games (MAA Column)   |   MathPuzzle.com   |   Wikipedia


 Dan Piponi Dan Piponi, computer graphics guru (b. 1966)

Thinker, tinkerer and  Academy Award  winner...  Signing  sigfpe,  Dan Piponi maintains a blog entitled  A Neighborhood of Infinity  (great name!)  which features some superb essays about quantum physics and other mathematical topics.

sigfpe   |   A Neighborhood of Infinity (blog)   |   Google Science Fair (2012-12-19)


 Simon Plouffe Simon Plouffe, numerologist (b. 1956)

Best known for his "Inverter" which attempts to express in terms of known constants some number given in decimal form. He collaborated to Sloane's Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences.

home   |   Plouffe's Inverter


 Henry Reich Henry Reich  (b. 1988)

Henry Reich  has been producing and narrating his  Minute Physics  videos since June 2011.  He draws entertaining stick figures to illustrate pithy comments that are scientifically accurate.  Reich holds an MS in Physics (thesis on GR) and is now a  digital artist in residence at the  Perimeter Institute.

Minute Physics (FB)  |  Henry's List  |  Anniversary  |  Making of... by Brady Haran  |  Minute Earth  |  Google+


 Edmund Robertson Edmund F. Robertson  (b. 1943)

Edmund Robertson is one of the two editors (with John O'Connor) of the authoritative  MacTutor History of Mathematics  archive.  He is a  Professor emeritus  of pure mathematics at the University of St Andrews.

home   |   stats   |   MacTutor History of Mathematics   |   Wikipedia


 Russell Rowlett Russell J. Rowlett, metrologist  (b. 1944)

Director of the Center for Mathematics and Science Education of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  He advocates his own system for naming large numbers by combining metric and Greek  (chemical)  prefixes.

home   |   CV   |   A Dictionary of Units of Measurement


 Dave Rusin David J. Rusin   (b. 1957)

Formerly an associate professor of mathematics at NIU (1986-2010) he's moved to the University of TexasDave Rusin  launched a website in 1996 to share mathematical tidbits he had collected since 1990,  using the  Mathematics Subject Classification  (MSC).

home   |   bio   |   personal   |   The Mathematical Atlas   |   Index (MSC)


 Christoph Schiller Christoph Schiller  (b. 1960)

Christoph Schiller is a citizen of the world who was raised in Italy, studied physics in Germany and obtained a Belgian Ph.D. in physics.  He has made available for free download (pdf) a nicely crafted physics textbook of about 1500 pages.

home   |   Motion Mountain


 Alom Shaha Alom Shaha, filmmaker

Alom Shaha is a physics teacher, film-maker, science writer and TV producer who works in London.  His approach to science communication was rewarded by a fellowship of the  National Endowment for Science Technology and the Arts.

home   |   article   |   Labreporter


 Neil James
 Alexander Sloane Neil J.A. Sloane,   AMS  Fellow   (b. 1939)

Neil James Alexander Sloane  created a huge  encyclopedia  (oeis.org)  of noteworthy integer sequences.  Each sequence is uniquely identified by a  6-digit  A-number  (e.g., A000055)  known far and wide as a  Sloane number.

home  |  stats  |  On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences  |  Last page of 100K E-Party  |  WP  |  Sloane's Gap


 Leonard Susskind Leonard Susskind,  top physicist  (b. 1940)

One of the founders of  string theory  (the term  worldsheet  is due to him).  Professor of theoretical physics at Stanford since 1979.  Since 2008, videos of his ongoing series of courses on  Modern Physics  (Stanford Continuing Studies)  have been made available on  YouTube  and  iTunesU.

blog   |   stats   |   LearnOutLoud   |   Wikipedia


 Fields Medal  Terry Tao Terence Tao,  mathematician   (b. 1975)

Terence Chi-Shen Tao  is a professor of mathematics at UCLA, born in Australia.  He was promoted to full professorship at age 24.  Terry Tao  received the  Fields Medal  in 2006  (see PAP) and was electedFellow of the Royal Society  in 2007.

home   |   stats   |   video profile   |   What's New?   |   blog   |   PhD (Princeton, 1996)   |   Wikipedia


 Vitalii Vanovschi Vitalii Vanovschi, software engineer

Vitalii Vanovschi  created  The Number Empire  in 2006.  He is a computer scientist with a strong interest in chemistry.  In 2009, he obtained his Ph.D from the  University of Southern California  and became a  software engineer  at Google.

home   |   LinkedIn   |   The Number Empire   |   Integral Calculator   |   Number Factorizer


 Mike de Villiers Mike de Villiers,   mathematics education

Michael de Villiers was a high-school teacher  (HDE in 1978, "Best Science Teacher" in 1983, DEd in 1990)  who went on to teach mathematics education.  Former editor of PYTHAGORAS, author of 7 books and over 150 papers.  Vice-chair of the SA Mathematics Olympiad Committee since 1997.

home   |   bio   |   Dynamic Geometry Sketches   |   Constant Width


 Eric W. Weisstein Eric W. Weisstein, encyclopedist   (b. 1969)

Weisstein  holds a BA in Physics from Cornell (1990) and degrees in  Planetary Astronomy  from Caltech  (MS in 1993 and Ph.D. in 1996).  He's the creator of  MathWorld,  a major online encyclopedia which was threatened, in 2000, by an infamous lawsuit from CRC, publisher of a book based on it.

  home   |   Eric's Favorite Links   |   Treasure Troves of Science   |   World of Mathematics   |   World of Physics


 Robin Whitty Robin Whitty, theorem collector   (b. 1960)

Whitty received his Ph.D. in 1984 from  London South Bank University,  where he is currently a visiting professor.  Inspired by  MacTutor's  Mathematician of the DayRobin Whitty  started  Theorem of the Day  in 2005, aiming for 366 theorems. 

home  |  MathSci  |  Theorem of the Day  |  Th. by Women (+ calendar)  |  Links  |  Cameos  |  MS & FB


 Ned Wright Edward L. "Ned" Wright, cosmologist

Astronomy Professor at UCLA (Los Angeles).


stats   |   Cosmology Tutorial   |   Cosmology Calculator


Sharing Science on the Web   |   Giants of Science   |   Solvay Conferences   |   Armorial
Nicolas Bourbaki   |   Lucien Refleu   |   Roger Apéry   |   Other Biographies

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